TIME MANAGEMENT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How much time do you have??

 

 

How do you spend your time?  Are you BUSY??

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Planning

Research shows that for every 1 minute you spend in planning, you will gain 10 in execution. 1 minute = 10 minutes. 10 minutes = 1 hour and 40 minutes!

This may seem amazing because you may feel like you are already doing all you can each day!

If you could just gain an extra half-hour a day through effective time management, you would have 22 more days available to you per year. 



You have to take time to make time to "sharpen the ax."

Planning is the difference between being REACTIVE and PROACTIVE. When you dont plan, you end up responding to the days events as they occur. 

 

 

 

 

 

What are you planning for??  What are you trying to achieve??

 

 

 

 

 

Do you have GOALS?

Lifetime - 10 year - 5 year - 1 year - 1 semester - 1 month - 1 week - 1 day

What is important to you?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Eisenhower Principle/Time-management Matrix

(Stephen Covey  The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People)

Important:  activities have an outcomes that leads to us achieving our goals (long-term consequences)

Urgent:  Activities that demand immediate attention, and are usually associated with achieving someone else's goals (short-term consequences)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which quadrant makes you BUSY?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You ALWAYS have time to do what you put first.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stuff someone probably already told you . . .

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Set priorities:  if you are spending too much time on low priority items, rethink; don't always do the most recent but least important thing

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Learn to use small chunks of time.  Don't wait for the several hour block which may never come

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Mark down everything, including assignments, dates, work, concerts, events, pub crawls

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Utilize "the night before" to be prepared (correct books in backpack, files in Dropbox instead of on desktop); use "remember" sticky notes, put list on to-do, alarm in phone

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Pencil in due dates when you should begin working on it ("paper due in one week")

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Begin assignments immediately

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Include daily schedule of classes, work, events but also deadlines

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Strategies against procrastination.  If you have an hour, maybe you can't write a paper, but you can proofread the part you have or read part of a chapter

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Use wasted time:  waiting for a class, in a doctor's office:  listen to taped lectures, read, study flash cards for things that must be memorized

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Even waiting in a grocery line, you could be reviewing what you are memorizing

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Divide your time into large categories.  It is not all about school, but socializing should  not be emphasized at the expense of school; balance the activities in your life

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Look at your calendar EVERY morning

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Tackle major projects in sections; do not wait until it is too late to do your best job

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Break down the material in major exams

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Get enough sleep.  Schedule when to stop and get rest.  This will help you remain relaxed and alert.  Those who become overwhelmed are those that give up.

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Remove distractions.  An hour at the library is worth two with distractions.

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Schedule classes close together to avoid the temptation to skip class or go out in between and not make it back in time; the earlier the class, the better prepared you will be as far as brain power to be attentive.

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Cramming does not stick

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Set your own deadlines for chunks of work (not just for the final project/paper)

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Don't let email/Facebook, etc. distract you from an hour

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Say "No" when you should

 

 

 

 

Remember

 

 

Take that, FOMO!!

 

   
   

 

 

 

  

Created and maintained by Vicky V. Johnson